Accused of Irregular Behavior on the USMLE? Here’s What You Need to Know

4 Indest-2009-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

At The Health Law Firm, we frequently receive calls for consultations from medical students and medical school graduates who receive a letter from the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME), concerning the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE). The letter may accuse the student or medical resident of “Irregular Behavior” concerning one or more of the USMLE Step examinations. In many cases, the person receiving the letter is a graduate of a foreign medical schools who have applied through the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG).

Irregular behavior can consist of many different actions taken by the applicant, before, during or after taking a USMLE step exam. What you must know is that, in effect, you are being accused of cheating or a similar type of infraction.

Types of Irregular Behavior.

Examples of the types of conduct which we have seen before include:

– Attending a commercial USMLE preparation course that provides some of the actual examination questions.

– Soliciting information on the actual contents or actual questions on the examination.

– Using a smart phone during the examination.

– Talking with another person during the examination.

– Sharing information on the types of questions or cases that were on your examination with another person or on a blog over the internet.

– Leaving the test room and looking up answers in a text during the examination.

– Setting the building on fire during the examination so that you won’t have to complete the examination.

– Forging your Step Exam grade or a document containing it and providing it to your medical school or residency program.

These are just a few. For more examples, please see an article I wrote on this by clicking here.

Most Common Errors You Will Make When Accused of Irregular Behavior.

We have represented students accused of irregular behavior by consulting with them before and after USMLE or ECFMG hearings and on appealing the results. We have represented a number of examinees at the hearings held before the NBME at its headquarters in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and before the ECFMG, which hearings are also usually held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

From our experience in such cases, the following are the most common errors made by the individual when accused by the USMLE or the ECFMG of irregular behavior:

1. Failure to retain the services of an attorney experienced with such cases immediately upon receipt of a letter from the NBME or ECFMG accusing you of irregular behavior. Take this as a formal charge accusing you of, in effect, cheating. THIS IS SERIOUS.

2. Telephoning, writing or e-mailing the NBME or ECFMG to explain “your side of the story.” Such a writing or conversation will be full of admissions that will help prove the case against you and you will not even understand this. (Please note that under U.S. law any statements you make, oral or written, can be used as evidence against you in any civil, criminal or administrative proceeding. This is not the case with statements that your attorney makes on your behalf.)

3. If you submit documents or statements to the NBME or ECFMG in support of your case, these will not be well-organized, well-labeled and in a form simple and easy to understand. In many instances, you will not even understand the legal issues you are facing or how to refute them.

4. You will fail to request or attend in person the hearing before the NBME or ECFMG Committee on Irregular Behavior or Committee on Individual Review (“The Committee”) in Philadelphia. You will mistakenly believe that a written statement and documents alone will carry the day and persuade them not to take adverse action against you.

5. You will fail to take an attorney experienced in such medical administrative hearings to represent you at The Committee hearing in Philadelphia.

6. You will not know how to properly present your evidence or present your own position to The Committee, if you do attend the hearing.

7. You will not know when or what kind of evidence (expert witness reports, statistical expert affidavits, affidavits of fact witnesses), you need to use to prove issues in your case before The Committee.

8. You will fail to understand and correctly respond to the questions that the many different Committee members (usually 12 or more) will ask you during the hearing.

9. You will fail to correctly follow all procedures in order to preserve your rights in the proceedings.

10. You will falsely believe that if you lose at The Committee hearing, it will be easy to win on appeal or somehow sue in court and prove you are right. This is almost never correct. You will have only one real chance at proving your case and this is at The Committee hearing in Philadelphia.

11. You will incorrectly believe that even if you are only suspended from taking the USMLE Step exams again for a short period of time, this will have no effect on your education or career. (Note: Your USMLE transcript will note this fact and this may prevent you from ever getting into a good residency program. See #1 above.)

Invest in Your Future Career.

You and your family have invested tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of dollars, on your education so that you can become a physician. You have spent years of sacrifice and studying in order to become a physician. This is not the time to be cheap and to think that the cost of hiring an experienced legal counsel is too high. You could lose everything you and your family has invested in this. Do not be “penny wise and pound foolish.” You will need professional help if you are to get through this successfully. If you don’t care about these matters or you don’t believe this is a serious matter worthy of an investment for attorney’s fees, then go ahead and ignore this advice.

If you are not reading this until after you have lost the case and been found to have committed “irregular behavior” by the USMLE Committee on Irregular Behavior or by the ECFMG Committee,, I am sorry for you, but it is probably too late to be able to really do anything about it.

Contact Experienced Health Law Attorneys For Irregular Behavior or USMLE Issues Today.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to medical students, residents, interns and fellows in academic disputes, graduate medical education (GME) hearings, contract negotiations, license applications, board certification applications and hearings, credential hearings, and civil and administrative litigations.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME), legal representation for medical students, legal representation for medical resident, Committee on Irregular Behavior (CIB) defense attorney, Committee for Individual Review (CIR) defense lawyer, legal representation for allegations of irregular behavior, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) legal defense lawyer, USMLE defense attorney, legal representation for USMLE hearings, USMLE appeals defense attorney, health care defense lawyer, medical student attorney, medical resident lawyer, medical intern attorney, legal representation for civil proceeding, legal representation for criminal proceeding, legal representation for administrative proceeding, legal representation for medical administrative hearings, legal representation for administrative law, The Health Law Firm reviews, reviews of The Health Law Firm attorneys

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2017 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

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Florida’s Baker Act: What You Need to Know – Part 2

10 Indest-2008-7By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Our firm is frequently retained to act to obtain the release of individuals erroneously confined and held involuntarily under the Baker Act. We hope to share some of the lessons we have learned in representing such individuals and obtaining their release.

This is Part 2 of our blog on Florida’s Baker Act. To read Part 1 of this blog, click here.

Selected Examples of Some of Our Prior Cases.

Here are examples of actual cases in which we have been retained to obtain the release of a Baker Act patient. We have changed the facts somewhat to protect the identities of the individuals and the facilities involved.

Case #1: An independent elderly woman who still worked and was completely independent tripped and fell in her apartment, injuring herself. Her roommate took her to the local hospital emergency room to be examined and treated for the physical injury. The emergency room staff had her involuntarily confined in the hospital’s Baker Act unit and would not release her. She was not a danger to herself or to others. She was completely independent and held a good paying job. Her roommate drove her around and to medical appointments. She had never been diagnosed with a mental illness before and had never been Baker Acted before. Because of the Baker Act confinement, she missed several of her regular medical appointments which she had scheduled.

Case #2: The president of a medium-sized manufacturing company in another state came to Florida for a business conference at which his company had a display. On the last night of the conference, he partied late, drank too much and a friend took him to a hospital emergency room. He had a plane ticket to leave the next day. The hospital emergency room staff diagnosed him with depression and had him involuntarily confined under the Baker Act. He missed his flight home, and one of his company officials had to come to Florida to try to get him released.

Case #3: The fairly new wife of a businessman who worked a lot and who already had two small children, delivered twins. About six months later, the nanny quit at during the same week that they were supposed to move to a new home. The wife went to her OB/GYN for her routine follow-up visit. She was tired and run down from the loss of her nanny, getting ready to move, taking care of all of the small children, etc. Questioning by her OB/GYN indicated that she may have been depressed. The OB/GYN had his two nurses from his office walk her over to the hospital emergency room (which was next door) to be Baker Acted. Her husband and kids were then at home without a nanny and without mom. Mom was angry and upset because she was not suicidal, felt that she had been betrayed by her doctor and was not a threat to herself, her children or anyone else. She felt she was a prisoner, confined without any rights.

Case #4: A 14-year-old girl in high school broke up with her best friend around Christmas time. She was somewhat depressed and wrote down her thoughts about “ending it all.” Several months later, at the end of the school semester someone found the anonymous note (it had been inside her textbook) and turned it into the teacher. The teacher and principal are eventually able to identify the handwriting and confront the teenager. She admitted that it was her note but denied any suicidal thoughts. The principal called the sheriff’s department and sheriff’s deputies came and took her away to a Baker Act facility over her parents’ protests. She was then involuntarily confined there.

Case #5: A happily married mother of three young adults (who were in college and lived with their mother and father) had a long history of depression for which she saw her own psychiatrist on a regular basis (for more than ten years) and received prescription medication to control it. Her psychiatrist routinely adjusted her medications as needed. Her psychiatrist had recently adjusted her medication, but then was out of town on vacation for two weeks. She had a reaction to the medication adjustment. She telephoned her psychiatrist’s office and was instructed to go to the nearest hospital emergency room to have her medications adjusted. She did this. Instead of getting her medications adjusted, she was involuntarily confined in the hospital’s behavioral health unit under the Baker Act, Her husband (a professional) and her children, who live with her and depend on her, are distraught and could not convince the hospital or its medical staff to release her.

The cases above are all based on actual cases in which we were retained by the individual or the family. We were able to obtain the individual’s prompt release from the Baker Act facility.

Serious Problems We See Over and Over Again.

– The staff and treating physician constantly pressure the patient to convert their involuntary confinement (which may be expiring shortly, or there may be no grounds to renew it) to a voluntary admission. If this occurs, then they can keep the person as long as they desire. However, they threaten that if the patient attempts to leave, even though the patient is now there voluntarily, then they will have the patient involuntarily confined under the Baker Act.

– The patient is angry and upset at being imprisoned when he or she came to the hospital voluntarily for help. As a result, he or she rants and raves and threatens the doctors and staff with litigation or refuses to talk to them. This may serve to reinforce the doctor and staff’s concerns that the patient is mentally ill or irrational.

– Some of our clients have expressed concerns that because they have excellent health insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, or TRICARE coverage (all of which cover hospitalizations), that they are being held involuntarily against their will when they should not be, while indigents who really have serious mental health issues are discharged immediately. They express concerns that they are being held involuntarily solely because the hospital and physician are getting paid to keep them.

– Individuals who have medical problems, but are successfully living independently and obtaining regular medical treatment for their ailments, may not receive the appropriate type of medical care they need when they are being confined in a psychiatric facility. Their prescription medications are at home, and they are not able to take their prescribed medications. Their regular treating physicians are not called or consulted. Their continuity of care is interrupted by the confinement.

– The regular treating physicians of those confined may not visit or see them while they are confined in a different hospital from the one(s) in which the treating physician has approved clinical privileges.

We Work to Get Victims Out Quickly.

Our firm has a process we follow to make sure that a person who should not be held under the Baker Act may be released in a very short time. If the basic criteria for a Baker Act confinement are not present, the person is not required to be held and should be released. If the person has been living independently for decades, has family and a support system available, and has had no prior mental health problems, the odds are he or she should not be involuntarily confined. We act immediately to begin our representation, to make the hospital and its physicians aware that we are representing a victim, and to take measures to obtain release. If required, we are prepared to file an emergency Petition for Writ of Habeas Corpus with the local Circuit Court to have the victim brought before the judge for an emergency release hearing. These cases can be time intensive, require a great deal of immediate work, but can yield fast results in most cases.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Handling Victims of Involuntary Confinement Through the Baker Act Act.

The Health Law Firm represents individuals, families and friends in challenges to and hearings related to the Florida Baker Act and Marchman Act, when the basic criteria for confinement are not met and there is no medical necessity for further confinement.

Our firm has a process we follow to make sure that a person who should not be held under the Baker Act may be released quickly. We act immediately to begin our representation, to make the hospital and its physicians aware that we are representing the victim, and to take measures to obtain release. If required, we are prepared to file an emergency Petition for Writ of Habeas Corpus with the local Circuit Court to have the victim brought before the judge for an emergency release hearing. These cases can be time intensive, require a great deal of immediate work, but can yield fast results in most cases.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: Legal representation for Baker Act cases, Baker Act defense attorney, legal representation for involuntary Baker Act confinement, legal representation for involuntary confinement in hospital, legal representation for confinement in Baker Act facility, legal representation for mental health confinement, petition for Writ of Habeas Corpus, Baker Act attorney, Baker Act defense lawyer, Florida Baker Act defense attorney, reviews of The Health Law Firm, The Health Law Firm attorney reviews, The Health Law Firm
“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2017 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Florida’s Baker Act: What You Need to Know – Part 1

7 Indest-2008-4By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

At The Health Law Firm, we are frequently consulted by family members of individuals who are erroneously held under Florida’s Baker Act. An erroneous confinement under the Baker Act can occur for a number of different reasons. However, the result is that an independent citizen is confined in violation of his/her constitutional rights to liberty, privacy and the pursuit of happiness.

The Baker Act allows a licensed health professional to order an individual who is a threat to themselves or others because of a mental illness to be involuntarily held. The individual may then be held in certain designated health facilities for up to 72 hours for an initial psychiatric evaluation.

If the psychiatrist examining the confined individual feels that he or she should be held for further evaluation, then he or she can be held up to a week.

When to Call a Baker Act Attorney.

Over-cautious physicians, emergency room personnel, school officials, nursing home staff and other authorities may call upon the Baker Act to have those that they suspect may be a danger and have a mental problem involuntarily confined. If they are believed to be a threat, usually that individual may be legally involuntarily confined under the Baker Act. Seniors living on their own and teenagers are often the “victims” of this process.

If the individual being held under the Baker Act is not really a threat to themselves or others and the facility will not agree to release them, this is the time to call an attorney. Mistakes often occur as health personnel, school administrators and law enforcement personnel do not want to take the chance of someone committing suicide or killing others.

Factors that may indicate the person should not be held under the Baker Act include:

1. No prior history of mental illness or Baker Acts.
2. Supportive family/friends in the immediate area.
3. Acts/statements made not truly a threat to self or others.
4. Regular treating physician or health care personnel in area.
5. No current signs of mental illness.

Examples of abuses of the Baker Act that can occur:

1. Individuals who do not have a mental condition and do not meet the basic criteria for the Baker Act may be involuntarily confined and deprived of their freedom.

2. Children are involuntarily confined at facilities that are not really set up to take care of the medical and mental health needs of children.

3. Because of overcrowding, the person is taken to or transferred to a facility far away from his or her home, family and friends.

4. A person who has other medical problems or chronic medical problems (especially true with the elderly) is confined in a Baker Act facility and is unable to receive regular medical care or attend scheduled appointments with their regular treating physicians.

5. A person who is taking one or more prescriptions for medical problems will not be allowed to take them while confined in the Baker Act facility. This can lead to a deterioration of the person’s medical condition.

6. If the person has a regular psychiatrist or therapist, that person is not allowed to see or treat the person where he or she is confined because the therapist is not on the medical staff of the Baker Act facility.

7. If the person has a regular psychiatrist or therapist, that psychotherapist is, most often, not spoken to or consulted by the psychiatrist or staff of the Baker Act facility, even though the regular treating psychotherapist may know far more about the confined patients condition than anyone else.

8. An individual may be confined in a facility in which one or more dangerous patients are also confined. Our clients have reported assaults and sexual molestation which have occurred at such facilities when they were confined involuntarily under the Baker Act.

9. It has been reported to us by our clients that it seems if they have good health insurance (or Medicare) then they are kept longer because the insurance company (or Medicare) is paying the hospital for the inpatient stay, which can be a large amount of money.

10. Sometimes the family is located in another state and merely wants to have the person released so he or she can be taken where they are so the family is better able to support their needs.

Examples of How The Health Law Firm Can Help.

We often receive calls from the husband, wife, parents, children or friends of individuals who have been confined involuntarily to a mental facility. Often, we are called on to respond urgently to obtain the release of someone who may have been incorrectly confined to a mental institution without their consent.

Occasionally, we assist in cases in which the family may be located in another state and the patient is located here in Florida. Often, we are able to obtain a prompt release of the confined person in cases in which the basic requirements for an involuntary confinement under Florida Law do not exist and the patient should not have been confined.

We have been involved in working on an expedited basis with the hospital, mental institution or court to obtain the release of individuals who should not be confined or who desire to be released into the custody and care of their family or back to their own independence.

For a sample of an Emergency Petition for Write of Habeas Corpus we prepared with its supporting documentation, and which contains citations to the appropriate legal authorities, click here.  A Memorandum of Law (legal brief) in support of the Petition for Writ of Habeas Corpus is also included with it.

The Baker Act Is Not a Bad Thing.

We realize that the Baker Act is a good thing. Many people who may have serious mental health issues and fail to obtain treatment, should be involuntarily confined under the Baker Act. Sometimes this is the only way they will ever be treated correctly. Additionally, it is also a good thing that police, deputy sheriffs and other law enforcement officers are receiving training which is now resulting in more Baker Act hospitalizations and fewer arrests. This helps an individual to avoid a serious arrest and possible conviction of a serious offense (giving them a criminal record forever) when they may need only medical treatment for a mental condition.

Check this blog regularly for more on Florida’s Baker Act and the Marchman Act.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Handling Victims of Involuntary Confinement Through the Baker Act and Marchman Act.

The Health Law Firm represents individuals, families and friends in challenges to and hearings related to the Florida Baker Act and Marchman Act, when the basic criteria for confinement are not met and there is no medical necessity for further confinement.

Our firm has a process we follow to make sure that a person who should not be held under the Baker Act may be released in a very short time. If the basic criteria for a Baker Act confinement are not present, the person is not required to be held and should be released. If the person has been living independently for decades, has family and a support system available, and has had no prior mental health problems, the odds are he or she should not be involuntarily confined. We act immediately to begin our representation, to make the hospital and its physicians aware that we are representing you, and to take measures to obtain release. If required, we are prepared to file an emergency Petition for Writ of Habeas Corpus with the local Circuit Court to have you brought before the judge for an emergency release hearing. These cases can be time intensive, require a great deal of immediate work, but can yield fast results in most cases.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

KeyWords: Baker Act defense attorney, legal representation for Baker Act cases, legal representation for involuntary Baker Act confinement, legal representation for involuntary confinement in hospital, mental health confinement defense attorney, petition for Writ of Habeas Corpus, Baker Act attorney, Baker Act defense lawyer, legal representation for Florida Baker Act, Florida Marchman Act defense attorney, legal representation for Baker Act law, The Health Law Firm, reviews of The Health Law Firm attorneys, The Health Law Firm reviews

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of and a registered service mark of The Health Law Firm, P.A., a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 2017 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Orlando To Be Site for Opening of First Florida Medical Marijuana Dispensary

By Shannon McDonough, Legal and Marketing Intern


Central Florida Making Strides Toward Medical Marijuana Acceptance.

Central Florida has jumped on the bandwagon with the acceptance of the alternative medicine, medical marijuana. The first medical marijuana dispensary in Florida is opening within the next few weeks in Orlando. It will offer patients the option of medical marijuana to help treat pain and other symptoms. The dispensary, being opened by Knox Medical, is to be located on North Orlando Avenue at Ivanhoe Village in Orlando, Florida. This is the first dispensary location in Florida. Knox Medical states that it hopes to open four additional sites around the state.

Knox Medical Group Is Licensed to Cultivate and Sell Medical Grade Marijuana.

Knox Medical is one of just a few companies that have obtained licenses to grow and sell medical grade marijuana. Knox Medical Group states that it expects this dispensary to be a respectable and exclusive venue. The dispensary contends that it will only allow entry by patients with clear physician orders to attempt to avoid anything that could create a negative perception of the medical marijuana industry. This “prescription only” approach is different from that of California and Colorado; nobody without a clear physician’s order for medical marijuana will be allowed to enter the building.

Law Makers Create Difficult Regulations for Marijuana Industry.

State regulation seems like it will always be a problem for the growing marijuana industry. There is the potential for new bills restricting the placement of medical marijuana dispensaries. Such a restriction could limit access to the drug and decrease consumption. Florida law makers are continuing to consider additional medical marijuana constitutional amendments. However, since the amendment that approved medical marijuana passed with a 71 percent vote, any measure proposed that will restrict access or availability will probably be defeated. As more and more states accept this alternative form of medicine, law makers will be forced to be flexible and deal with it.

Knox Medical Group Plans To Open Additional Locations All Around Florida.

The city of Orlando approved the new medical marijuana center restricting it to products with less than .3 percent THC. The effects of marijuana itself, along with the effects of marijuana dispensaries, are still being studied.

Knox Medical group states that it plans to open additional locations in Gainesville, Tallahassee, Jacksonville, and Lake Worth in the coming years.
To view prior blogs The Health Law Firm has published on Medical Marijuana, click here: https://medicalmarijuanalawblog.wordpress.com/

Contact Experienced Health Law Attorneys for Medical Marijuana Concerns.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys can assist health care providers and facilities, such as doctors, pharmacists and pharmacies, wanting to participate in the medical marijuana industry. We can assist in preparing and completing applications for registration, permitting and or licensing. We can also represent doctors, dispensaries, pharmacies, and pharmacists facing proceedings brought by state regulators or agencies.

Sources:

Ferrante, Deanna. “Orlando’s First Medical Marijuana Dispensary Slated to Open in Ivanhoe Village.” Orlando Weekly.  (Mar. 7, 2017). Web.

Shanklin, Mary. “Orlando’s First Medical Marijuana Dispensary Planned for Ivanhoe Village.” Orlando Sentinel. (Mar. 8, 2017). Web.

About the Author: Shannon McDonough is a legal and marketing intern at the Health Law Firm. She is an undergraduate student at Rollins College pursuing her bachelors in Economics with a minor in Spanish and Communications. The Health Law Firm’s main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

Key Words: Medical and recreational marijuana use, legal counsel for medical marijuana, medical marijuana defense attorney, legal representation for medical marijuana growers and distributors, expanding marijuana industry in Florida, medical marijuana growers and distributors, expanding marijuana industry in Florida, medical marijuana dispensary defense attorney, The Health Law Firm Reviews, lawyer for medical marijuana growers and distributors, health lawyers for marijuana distributors, medical marijuana lawyer, legal counsel for marijuana industry, approval of Florida Constitution Amendment 2, The Health Law Firm attorney reviews, The Health Law Firm

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of The Health Law Firm, P.A., and Florida professional service corporation, since 1999, and is also a registered service mark. Copyright © 2017 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Orlando To Be Site for Opening of First Florida Medical Marijuana Dispensary

By Shannon McDonough, Legal and Marketing Intern


Central Florida Making Strides Toward Medical Marijuana Acceptance.

Central Florida has jumped on the bandwagon with the acceptance of the alternative medicine, medical marijuana. The first medical marijuana dispensary in Florida is opening within the next few weeks in Orlando. It will offer patients the option of medical marijuana to help treat pain and other symptoms. The dispensary, being opened by Knox Medical, is to be located on North Orlando Avenue at Ivanhoe Village in Orlando, Florida. This is the first dispensary location in Florida. Knox Medical states that it hopes to open four additional sites around the state.

Knox Medical Group Is Licensed to Cultivate and Sell Medical Grade Marijuana.

Knox Medical is one of just a few companies that have obtained licenses to grow and sell medical grade marijuana. Knox Medical Group states that it expects this dispensary to be a respectable and exclusive venue. The dispensary contends that it will only allow entry by patients with clear physician orders to attempt to avoid anything that could create a negative perception of the medical marijuana industry. This “prescription only” approach is different from that of California and Colorado; nobody without a clear physician’s order for medical marijuana will be allowed to enter the building.

Law Makers Create Difficult Regulations for Marijuana Industry.

State regulation seems like it will always be a problem for the growing marijuana industry. There is the potential for new bills restricting the placement of medical marijuana dispensaries. Such a restriction could limit access to the drug and decrease consumption. Florida law makers are continuing to consider additional medical marijuana constitutional amendments. However, since the amendment that approved medical marijuana passed with a 71 percent vote, any measure proposed that will restrict access or availability will probably be defeated. As more and more states accept this alternative form of medicine, law makers will be forced to be flexible and deal with it.

Knox Medical Group Plans To Open Additional Locations All Around Florida.

The city of Orlando approved the new medical marijuana center restricting it to products with less than .3 percent THC. The effects of marijuana itself, along with the effects of marijuana dispensaries, are still being studied.

Knox Medical group states that it plans to open additional locations in Gainesville, Tallahassee, Jacksonville, and Lake Worth in the coming years.
To view prior blogs The Health Law Firm has published on Medical Marijuana, click here: https://medicalmarijuanalawblog.wordpress.com/

Contact Experienced Health Law Attorneys for Medical Marijuana Concerns.

The Health Law Firm’s attorneys can assist health care providers and facilities, such as doctors, pharmacists and pharmacies, wanting to participate in the medical marijuana industry. We can assist in preparing and completing applications for registration, permitting and or licensing. We can also represent doctors, dispensaries, pharmacies, and pharmacists facing proceedings brought by state regulators or agencies.

Sources:

Ferrante, Deanna. “Orlando’s First Medical Marijuana Dispensary Slated to Open in Ivanhoe Village.” Orlando Weekly.  (Mar. 7, 2017). Web.

Shanklin, Mary. “Orlando’s First Medical Marijuana Dispensary Planned for Ivanhoe Village.” Orlando Sentinel. (Mar. 8, 2017). Web.

About the Author: Shannon McDonough is a legal and marketing intern at the Health Law Firm. She is an undergraduate student at Rollins College pursuing her bachelors in Economics with a minor in Spanish and Communications. The Health Law Firm’s main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

Key Words: Medical and recreational marijuana use, legal counsel for medical marijuana, medical marijuana defense attorney, legal representation for medical marijuana growers and distributors, expanding marijuana industry in Florida, medical marijuana growers and distributors, expanding marijuana industry in Florida, medical marijuana dispensary defense attorney, The Health Law Firm Reviews, lawyer for medical marijuana growers and distributors, health lawyers for marijuana distributors, medical marijuana lawyer, legal counsel for marijuana industry, approval of Florida Constitution Amendment 2, The Health Law Firm attorney reviews, The Health Law Firm

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of The Health Law Firm, P.A., and Florida professional service corporation, since 1999, and is also a registered service mark. Copyright © 2017 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Jury Finds Four New Orleans Doctors and Others Guilty for Participation in $13.6 Million Medicare Fraud Scheme

George IndestBy George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

On May 9, 2017, a federal jury found four New Orleans doctors and two others guilty for their participation in a Medicare fraud scheme. According to prosecutors the defendants netted more than $13.6 million in fraudulent Medicare reimbursements.

Details of the Scheme.

The six defendants worked for or with Abide Home Care Services (Abide) in New Orleans. Federal prosecutors said Abide routinely falsified diagnoses so Medicare reimbursements were inflated. Abide also falsified medical records that supported medically unnecessary home health services, prosecutors said. Abide was owned by Lisa Crinel, who pleaded guilty to her role in the scheme in 2015.

In exchange for their role in the scheme, Abide made monthly payments to the doctors that were falsely characterized as medical consultant or director fees. Abide also hired Dr. Michael Jones’ wife Paula Jones and inflated her salary payments to pay for fraudulently certifying documents. Additionally, Jonathan Nora scheduled doctor visits with Abide “well knowing” that the referral did not come from the beneficiary’s own health care professional.

The Trial.

After a month long trial, a federal jury returned guilty verdicts against the six individuals charged with committing Medicare fraud. Found guilty were Dr. Henry Evans, Dr. Michael Jones and his wife Paula Jones, Dr. Shelton Barnes, Dr. Gregory Molden and Jonathon Nora. Click here to read the press release issued by Acting U.S. Attorney Duane Evans’s Office in Eastern District of Louisiana.

The Consequences.

Dr. Evans was found guilty of five counts of health care fraud. Dr. Michael Jones, Paula Jones, Dr. Barnes, Dr. Molden and Jonathan Nora each were found guilty of conspiracies to commit health care fraud, defrauding the United States, receiving and paying kickbacks and health care fraud, according to the U.S. Attorneys Office. The four doctors and Nora were convicted of additional individual counts of health care fraud. Dr. Shelton Barnes was additionally convicted of obstruction of a federal audit.

Dr. Barnes faces a maximum penalty of up to 170 years in federal prison; Dr. Molden faces up to 115 years; Dr. Michael Jones faces up to 95 years; Dr. Evans faces up to 50 years in federal prison; Paula Jones faces up to 15 years; and Nora faces up to 25 years. Each also faces a maximum fine of up to $250,000 for each count.

Doctors Beware.

In our practice we have represented a number of doctors who have been exploited by nonphysicians intent on committing fraud. They will often target older and semi-retired physicians. The goal is merely to get their name and identification number to use in falsifying medical records and claims. If the deal you are being offered seems like too good of a deal, involves little or no work on your part to receive a large check each month or involves working for nonphysicians or individuals you do not know, you should beware. Always know who you are working for, the location of their actual place of business and residence, and with whom (physician-wise) they have done business before. You do not want to spend the later years of your life in prison, after pursuing an honorable career for decades.
Health Care Fraud Should Not Be Taken Lightly.

We have been consulted by many individuals, both before and after criminal convictions for fraud or related offenses. In many cases, those subject to Medicare fraud audits and investigations refuse to acknowledge the seriousness of the matter. Some may even decide not to spend the money required for a highly experienced health attorney to defend them.

The government is serious about combating health care fraud. It created a Medicare Fraud Strike Force in March of 2007, in an effort to further prevent and eliminate fraud and abuse of government health care programs. False claims are a growing problem in the program, costing the government billions of dollars each year. Accordingly, punishments for defrauding the system can be quite severe.

If you are accused of Medicare fraud, realize that you are in a fight for your life. Your liberty, property/possessions and profession are all at stake. Often it is possible to settle allegations of Medicare fraud by agreeing to pay civil monetary penalties and fines. If given such an opportunity, the Medicare provider should consider whether it is worth the risk of facing decades in prison. Be prepared to give up whatever you need to in order to avoid a conviction and preserve your liberty.

To read further about the seriousness of Medicare fraud, click here to read one of my prior blogs.

Additionally, you can watch our informational video blog on Medicare fraud, here.

Don’t Wait Until It’s Too Late; Consult with a Health Law Attorney Experienced in Medicare Issues Now.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm represent healthcare providers in Medicare audits, ZPIC audits and RAC audits throughout Florida and across the U.S. They also represent physicians, medical groups, nursing homes, home health agencies, pharmacies, hospitals and other healthcare providers and institutions in Medicare and Medicaid investigations, audits, recovery actions and termination from the Medicare or Medicaid Program.

For more information please visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com or call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001.
Sources:

Lane, Emily. “4 New Orleans doctors, 2 others convicted in $13.6 million Medicare fraud scheme.” The Times-Picayune. (May 10, 2017). Web.

“4 New Orleans doctors, 2 others convicted in $13.6 million Medicare fraud scheme.” Health Leaders Media. (May 11. 2017). Web.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.
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